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you with us. another historic event for pope benedict the 16th this week. his four-day visit to the yinged kingdom. king henry viii broke ties with the roman catholic church almost 500 years ago. as kim reports, benedict's trip has not been without controversy. >> pope benedict went to the uk at the invitation of queen elizabeth ii, the official head of england. the only was john pall ii in 1982. he was greeted with an outpouring of affection. pope benedict has faced outright protests. one major issue is outrage over the clergy sex abuse crisis still swirling over many parts of europe. at the beginning of the trip, benedict admitted the church was not quick and decisive to take the necessary measures to combat the crisis. another is between roman catholics and the anglo-american community. last october the vatican made it easier for disaffected anglocans to become catholic. a highlight is the trip is the -- but perhaps the biggest challenge has been making the case for faith and a nation known for growing secularism. throughout the trip benedict called for the values of cultu
$30 sml a years which which is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be ratified by the u.
sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. one word describes the mood of american businesses these days-- "uncertainty." susie, many companies are flush with cash, but they're not spending it or using it to hire workers because they're uncertain about the outlook on a host of important issues. >> susie: whether it's taxes, tom, new regulations, or health care reform, executives are not sure how these policies will impact their businesses. many economists say that uncertainty is a significant obstacle to economic recovery. >> tom: lawmakers return next week to washington, and republicans are expected to reopen debate on parts of healthcare reform. as stephanie dhue reports that'll add even more uncertainty to the business environment. >> as the november election draws near, senate republicans are sharpening their differences with democrats on health care. senator mike johanns says new requirements for small business tax filing have to go. he's making a case for that on youtube. >> this will mean a mountain of new paperwork for as many as 40 million businesses and ot
us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are a lot of people missing still now. in terms of destruction, it was devast
, there is a bogyman around washington. european style socialism, and it is coming to get us. there are a lot of people who say you want european-style socialism, which causes me to wonder and tremble -- it is it going to be like england? germany? france? the most insidious thing is to build europe's government system and to some big threat to the united states. 27 nations in the european union alone is like any other part of the world. some things are better than others, some work better than others. some things are a threat to the way we do things here if we were to adopt them, and there is not much chance of that. they would feel the way we do things a threat to the way they do things. the differences -- rather than being in a bunker worrying about the dreadful socialism coming across the atlantic, we should really just look and see what works better and incorporate it. we always have done, even the language we speak here, coming from over there. actually, two languages spoken here come from over there. let's take a look at other countries, let's see what works, and improve them if necessary. we do
. >> they know they are short of their mandate on both counts. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
, theen engine that connects us. >> chevron. this is the power of human energy. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation, supporting science, technology and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: president obama spent this labor day in the midwest to rally with union members and unveil a new plan to promote job growth. but even as he sharpend his focus on the economy, his political opponents sharpened their responses. >> around the nation this holiday, parades, barbecues and a continuing unease over the dismal jobs market. coming just after friday's report showing unemployment had edgeded up again to 9.6%, this was a labor day in which the state of the american work force was very much front and center. with that in mind and with a mid-term election just two months off, president obama we
to the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us into a showdown. the only thing that can make as budget is a showdown. >> that showdown may force the government into further concessions, perhaps of face saver for the unions. two-thirds of the country are for reforms already approved by the house. it is president sarkozy who has the open hand. -- the upper hand. startednd's economy has to shrink again, despite coming out of recession earlier this year. gdp was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year. that contrasts with predictions it would have a small increase. the controversial diabetes drug avandia has been suspended. it has been linked to increased risk of heart failure. youtube and its owners have won a landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. each channel said its rights and violated when its videos were broadcast on youtube. the court found it was the copyright holder's responsibility to report the contents to youtube. the chairman for the international palate -- panel on climate change. it was reported that the panel contained an errone
of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger is the world's poorest nation. for the past year, the unite
. if we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with tim robbins is coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: please welcome tim robbins back to this program. the actor and director also serves as writer for a play called "break the whip" about jamestown. here is now a scene from "break the whip." [drums beating] ♪ tavis: when you called me and asked me to come down to rehearsal to check this out. -- to check this out, i had no idea what i was going to see. imagine a piece about jamestown that does not mention pocahontas or -- >> or john smith. tavis: i was talking to our producer. i was curious ho
department official said today the u.s. was disappointed that israel allowed the building moratorium to expire. u.s. official middle east envoy george mitchell heads back to the region tomorrow with stops in israel and ramallah. both sides have accepted an invitation to resume talks in paris next month. >> ifill: for more on what's holding these talks together so far, we turn to ghaith al-omari, the advocacy director for the american task force on palestine, and a former advisor to president abbas. and david makovsky, senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy and the co-author of "myths, illusions, and peace." for let's talk about myths, illusions and peace, gait al on ari. what happened today. why didn't the palestinians walk away from the table as they promised they would if the settlements were not frozen. >> because they realized that the price of walking out from the talks is very high s very high from a domestic strategic perspective. ultimately they have no choice. and if you want to get a palestinian state the only way to get is through negotiations and t
. four simple words mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from london, a special edition of "charlie rose." >> charlie: lord peter mandelson is here. he's a member of britain's how was lords, former cabinet minister under prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown, a key architect of the labour campaign that helped his party rise to power in 1997. he served as secretary of state for trade and industry, secretary of state for northern ireland and secretary of state for business. he has now written a book about those years of public service. it is called "the third man, life at the heart of new labour," i am pleased to have peter mandelson back on this program. welcome. >> nice to be back. >> charlie: let me get to some of the controversy first. that tony blair is not happy that your book is coming out as it did, because -- and that somehow it's created a li
1994's "contract with america," and the grand signing ceremony on the steps of the u.s. capitol. today, house republican leaders appeared in shirt sleeves at a hardware and lumber store in suburban virginia 30 miles from capitol hill with this year's policy prescriptions. minority leader john boehner and his top lieutenants spelled out their central point. >> government is out of control in washington, and we need to rein it in, and begin a new drive for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government in our nation's capital. these are the things that the american people are demanding, >> reporter: while the backdrop has changed, republicans hope their document, called "a pledge to america," will produce similar results to 1994. that year's plan helped the party gain 54 seats and take the house majority for the first time in 40 years. one of the main architects of the 2010 version is california's kevin mccarthy. he accused democrats of ignoring the country's wishes. >> from the billion dollar bailouts to the stimulus package that failed to stimulate, to the government takeover o
merit. >> i would like to get back to the word that phil used which is charisma and obama's charisma. that seems to me is what a lot of these tea party candidates have. that have this charismatic way about them. somebody like christine o'donnell, really very perky. >> let's explain. >> choose from delaware. she won the republican primary. very perky, very personable. a lot of the things that attract people to sarah palin are attracted to christine o'donnell in that way could you have ren paul has charisma of his own in kentucky. he is very plain-spoken. he's very sort of forthright. he seems very genuine to people. that is very charismatic. that is something that i think democrats are going to have to look at. they talk about the energy. >> people feel they want somebody on a horse riding up to the west to the south in the >> exactly. these people seem to be on a horse. the horse the what the right is what they feel is a horse against the president's social democratic policies. they do not like them. they do not want them. the democrats have to point out why these social democratic p
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
and what it tells us about the regime. >> brown: then margaret warner interviews former british prime minister and united nations envoy tony blair about the newest round of middle east peace talks. >> i find it hard to see if these two political leader s in this context with an american administration pushing for a deal, if we can't get one, i don't know where we go from there. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a jewish entrepreneur working with palestinians and israelis for both peace and profit. >> brown: susan dentzer of "health affairs" and karen tumulty of the "washington post" sort through the latest give- and-take on health care politics. >> ifill: and we sit down with writer and cartoonist austin kleon for a dose of poetry inspired by newspaper prose. >> what i found out is that i need to treat the newspaper as a blank canvas in order to really come up with a good poem. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was
harm u.s. troops. the event was planned for saturday on the nine of -- anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. terry jones is getting criticism from the white house and fbi, but around the world there have already been protests. >> the president was forced to spend a rare news conference making an appeal for tolerance, saying muslims were neighbors and friends. the trouble is it looks as though he is getting more publicity to a group on the fringe. pastor jones is the leader of a church with a congregation of 50. he believes is what is the work of the devil and the threat and to burn korans. he said if forced muslims to abandon a plan to build a center on ground zero. >> we are still very hopeful that we will meet with the imam. >> it seems the koran burning will not happen. >> we are not at war against islam. we are at war against terrorist organizations. they have distorted islam or falsely used the banner of islam to engage in their destructive acts. >> and afghanistan, at the president's word has not been heard. protesters shouted death to obama. he warned the lives of u.s. troops are und
out to sell books because of protests for one reason or the other. they use all of the sense of animus, it seems. what is it about? >> it's difficult to say, really. i mean, first of all, you know, as i always point out to people, i did win three elections rather than lose them. >> rose: (laughs) yes, you did. yes, and some say you should have quit then. >> some say i should never have started. but you can't listen to all those voices. and also, frankly, there's a huge difference between the people who will come and protest, the people no who throw things at you are not, in my book, normal people. most normal people, even though they disagree with you, have a disagreement with you, they don't feel the need to either shout at you or throw something at you, they just say "well, i disagree." there was a poll just a few days ago that showed on balance a positive appreciation of my time as prime minister. is so i think this thing is... parts of, frankly, you live as a progress progressive politician as well with parts of the right of the media can be pretty aggressive when taking you on. wh
sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think it's going to work with independents or republicans. i think what democrats are trying t
the european union used enprecedented language to rebuke one of its most powerful states >> this is a digrace. >> the commissioner said there was paralleling with world war ii >> this is a situation i would thought europe would not have to witness again after the second world war. >> enough is enough. >> the french government says the roma are actually given 300 euros each when they leave the county >> france is a proud founding member and rarely received such a dressing down and deliberately mislead the eu. part of the union's anger relates to an internal french memo when mentions dimantels roma camps a priority. some see it as targeting ethnic group. >> i am against discrimination. >> i think the french government is not totally wrong. >> it's pointed out here that other countries have removed thousands of romas without attracting such criticism. and the help hasn't been fully used. but today's comments are a huge embarrassment to an embattled president, sarkozy, now he stands as playing the tough cop. so far, he has not responded to today's attack. although the french foreign ministry s
out. they've exempted health and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in
given a hero's welcome on his return to china. do stay with us, if you can, on "bbc world news." . still to come -- fresh hope for the chilean miners. how are the men coping belowground? first though, for days, there have been doubts about delhi's readiness for the commonwealth games. now the athletes are going in. for six days, officials have been pulling out all the stops. >> members of the nigerian team were arriving in the airport'. the anglin contingent started moving into the games village -- the england that contingent started moving into the games region. there is still a lot of work being done. frantic construction is carrying on, and the army has rebuilt the bridge that collapsed last week. they are feeling the heat, but they still found time. they are confident that eventually everything will be in top shape. >> we are cleaning up the rooms. but the public areas. -- the public areas we have also said that everyone has to work double time. >> most of the venues are being restored as the elite troops to go about securing them. india is taking a chances. >> the preparations are a
father's successor. >> stay with us if you cannot on bbc world news. still to come -- a fifth of the world's plant species are now in danger of disappearing forever. first, she is said to be one of the most photographed people on our planet. a new exhibition of formal photographs document the life of britain's queen elizabeth in pictures. many were taken by her late sister's husband, the photographer lord snowden. >> on her right, mr. anthony armstrong jones. >> he was a society photographer who took pictures of the royals and then became one. tony armstrong jones's wedding to princess margaret was the society event of 1960. although he was not a member of the royal family, lord snowden continued to work as a professional photographer. alongside his documentary work, he was often called on to photograph the queen. many of his photographs have been included in a new exhibition, but the graphic portraits of the queen. here is an image of the monarch and her husband in the kind of formal pose you might expect, and the queen caught by a range of photographers' in less orthodox sur
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)